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Photographer's Note

This is my 666 photo here.
Hmm, very sacral number. I taken an information from Wiki and would like to add one to my note.

The Number of the Beast is a concept from the Book of Revelation of the New Testament of the Christian Bible, relating to the figure of "The Beast". The number is 666 in most manuscripts of the New Testament, and in modern translations and critical editions of the Greek text.

The Number of the Beast is described in the Book of Revelation 13:17–18. The original Greek reads:

17 καὶ ἵνα μή τις δύνηται ἀγοράσαι ἢ πωλῆσαι εἰ μὴ ὁ ἔχων τὸ χάραγμα, τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ θηρίου ἢ τὸν ἀριθμὸν τοῦ ὀνόματος αὐτοῦ. 18 ὧδε ἡ σοφία ἐστίνˇ ὁ ἔχων νοῦν ψηφισάτω τὸν ἀριθμὸν τοῦ θηρίου, ἀριθμὸς γὰρ ἀνθρώπου ἐστίνˇ καὶ ὁ ἀριθμὸς αὐτοῦ ἑξακόσιοι ἑξήκοντα ἕξ.

The number is the final 3 words (transliterated: hexakósioi hexēkonta héx), meaning "six hundred sixty-six".

The King James Version of the Bible translates:[2]

And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.

In the Old Testament, both 1 Kings 10:14 and 2 Chronicles 9:13 state that Solomon collected "six hundred threescore and six" talents of gold each year. John's reference to "wisdom" and "understanding" might also point toward Proverbs 1 and 2, where understanding, discernment, wisdom and insight are explained and advised by King Solomon. In the Greek manuscripts, the number is rendered in Greek numerical form or sometimes literally as ἑξακόσιοι ἑξήκοντα ἕξ, hexakósioi hexēkonta héx, "six hundred and sixty-six".

Scholars such as Dr. Ellen Aitken, Dean of the Faculty of Religious Studies at McGill University, have speculated that the reference to this passage was a way of speaking in code about then contemporary figures whom it would have been politically dangerous to criticize openly.

Some commentators, not only the contemporary but also some ancient ones like Andreas of Caesarea or Origen, reflect an alternative attitude on textual matters of Revelation, in that they accept more than one reading when they know more. For example the Greek νοείν, as in "ὁ ἔχων νοῦν ψηφισάτω", has been suggested to mean "read between the lines", "penetrate below the surface" by Cuthbert Hamilton Turner as a means to indirectly reference Roman power.

There are several interpretations-translations for the meaning of the phrase "Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast" where the peculiar Greek word ψηφισάτω (psefisato) is used. Possible translations include not only "to count", "to reckon" but also "to vote" or "to decide".

Budapestman, s_lush oznaczył to zdjęcie jeko użyteczne

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Serghei Pakhomoff (serp2000) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3757 W: 76 N: 5850] (47063)
  • Genre: Ludzie
  • Medium: Kolorowe
  • Date Taken: 2010-09-26
  • Categories: Śmieszne
  • Naświetlenie: f/3.1, 1/160 sekund
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Wersja zdjęcia: Oryginalna wersja
  • Date Submitted: 2010-10-01 0:25
Viewed: 1991
Points: 20
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