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Photographer's Note

The light conditions were a bit difficult but I liked this sculpture in the museum in the Waitangi Treaty grounds.

Waitangi is a locality in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand. It is close to the town of Paihia (of which it is considered a part). The name means weeping waters in Māori.
Waitangi is best known for being the location where the Treaty of Waitangi was first signed on February 6, 1840. It is also the place where the Declaration of Independence of New Zealand was signed five years earlier, on October 28, 1835. This document was ratified by the British Crown the following year (1836). The Treaty of Waitangi proper began on February 5, 1840 when a public meeting was held on the grounds in front of James Busby's residence. Lieutenant Governor Hobson read a proposed document to the 300 or so European and Māori who were in attendance and then provided the Māori chiefs an opportunity to speak. Initially, a large number of chiefs (including Te Kemara, Rewa and Moka Te Kainga-mataa) spoke against accepting the Crown's proposition to rule over Aotearoa. Later in the proceedings a few chiefs began to entertain the idea; amongst the more notable chiefs to support the Crown were Te Wharerahi, Pumuka, and the two Hokianga chiefs, Tāmati Wāka Nene and his brother Eruera Maihi Patuone. The proceedings were ended and were to recommence on February 7; however, a number of chiefs pressed to sign earlier. The Treaty of Waitangi was initially signed on February 6, 1840 in a marquee erected in the grounds of James Busby's house at Waitangi by representatives of the British Crown, the chiefs of the Confederation of the United Tribes of New Zealand, and other Māori tribal leaders, and subsequently by other Māori chiefs at other places in New Zealand. Not all of the chiefs chose to sign this document, with a number of chiefs either delaying or refusing to put pen to paper.

The guys sit in waka, they have a small branch to show they come in peace.

Wakas are Māori watercraft, usually canoes ranging in size from small, unornamented canoes (waka tīwai) used for fishing to large decorated war canoes.

A pōwhiri (welcome ceremony) usually begins outside the marae with a wero (challenge). A warrior from the tangata whenua (hosts) will challenge the manuhiri (guests), checking to see whether they are friend or foe. He may carry a taiaha (spear-like weapon), and will lay down a token - often a small branch - for the visitors to pick up to show they come in peace.


Bigger beta picture

There is the big waka on the grounds, it is in a special shelter

Fis2, ChrisJ, pajaran, holmertz, snunney, jhm, pierrefonds, PiotrF, COSTANTINO, mcmtanyel oznaczył to zdjęcie jeko użyteczne

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Additional Photos by Malgorzata Kopczynska (emka) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 11569 W: 123 N: 29422] (138702)
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