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Great Luko 2007-06-07 6:44

"Alienation", you said, Prantik, isn't that what photography is all about? Isn't that play of light and shadows, the accumulation of geometry, an estrangement to reality.

I like to see the photography I like as mythical medium, ie. not descriptive to reality, rather myth/story telling.
My best and longest friend is probably one of the two three french scholar specialist about travel litterature and photography (yes, there are people doing such interesting thesis) : we've been discussing a long time about the matter (you wouldn't imagine how pleasant it can be to be in the midst of a malay stilt village, talking about photo philosophy, in between getting people shots. I think all my photography owes him.).

He once gave me interesting keys to analyze photography in a matrix sort. I've been developping it in a very old TrekEarth thread, as a response to Philip Coggan if I remember. I cannot find it though. Well, just to say, the way I felt comfortable with photo was in the mythical sort : pulling out my own story out of sheer reality, "adjusting" my focus on reality in a way it would mean something for the viewer, not necessarily the truth but my own truth. I had Henry Miller, the writer, in mind "My life is a diamond with a thousand facets, I have a thousand truth, each a different facet of the same diamond".

I have to say your Mexico shots raised my interest for the place, it operated like waves, after Animesh, Miss Pup and El Sato contributions.

But this is far away from my playgrounds, Asia, I fear the adaptation time before I get into the rythm or the pulse of the country. Asia is my blood, I intuitively know when or when not after going back and forth for 12 years.

And there's that geometry strictness. Mexico seems so cubical, while Asia shows smoothly interweaving curves... how weird.

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Old 06-11-2007, 08:26 PM
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Default To Luko: Photosophy

>"you wouldn't imagine how pleasant it can be to be in the midst of a malay stilt
> village, talking about photo philosophy, in between getting people shots"

I missed the very last 's' at the end of the above sentence first time I read it and was wondering about your taste in travel destination and your sense of "pleasant ambiance". Upon second reading, I get it.

Jokes aside, you left a thoughtful comment and I do appreciate it. Far be it from me to provide any insight into the philosophy of photography. Until about a year ago I did not even know what F-stop was. I can only speak for myself. Over the past one year I have ventured into various different styles and types of photography and tried different things and have slowly come to realize that my photography is simply an intuitive and knee-jerk reaction to the stimuli my immediate milieu brings forth. I am truly a “reactive photographer” as opposed to a “thinking photographer”. In that sense, photography is a quintessential "mythical" medium for me as my reflexive response prods me document a fleeting moment that resonates with a highly subjective and generalized vision I usually develop of a place from my limited exposure. The following quote is the closest thing to a “philosophy” I carry while walking in the streets with my camera.

“The moments of the past do not remain still. They retain in our memory the motion which drew them toward the future, towards a future which has itself become the past, and draw us on in their train.”
--Marcel Proust


PS: You should seriously consider Mexico for a trip. I bet my paycheck, you will not be disappointed.
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